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Full text of "Ninety-eighth Commencement August 9, 1968. Savannah State College"

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Meldrim Auditorium 



O MASTER, LET ME WALK WITH THEE 



i 

O Master, let me walk with Thee 
In lowly paths of service free; 
Tell me Thy secret, help me bear 
The strain of toil, the fret of care. 

II. 

Help me the slow of heart to move 
By some clear winning word of love; 
Teach me the wayward feet to stay, 
And guide them in the homeward way. 

in. 

Teach me Thy patience, still with Thee 
In closer dearer company, 
In work that keeps faith sweet and strong, 
In trust that triumphs over wrong. 

IV. 

In hope that sends a shining ray 
Far down the future's broadening way, 
In peace that only Thou canst give, 
With Thee, O Master, let me live. 

Amen. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE HYMN 

Let us give thanks and praise to Thee, 
To our Alma Mater, S. S. C. 
Thine honor, pride, and eminence, 
We raise in prayerful reverence. 

Guide us still from day to day, 
Be Thou mindful lest we lose our way; 
Help us know that life, short or long, 
Means unceasing work for weak and strong. 

REFRAIN 

Where Savannah meets the sea, 

Where grassy plains and palms abound, 

Where the flow'rs are gems of loveliness, 

There S. S. C. is found, 

We adore each beauteous scene and hall, 

Our all we pledge to Thee! 

In our hearts we'll build a shrine for Thee, 

We hail Thee, S. S. C. 



. Randolph Fisher 
Hillary Hatchett 



THE ORDER OF EXERCISES 

ACADEMIC PROCESSION: "War March of the Priests" Felix Mendelssohn 

(from "Athalia") 

Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Organist 

HYMN: "O Master, Let Me Walk With Thee" — - - Henry P. Smith 

INVOCATION: The Reverend Samuel Williams 

College Minister 

RESPONSE: "Hear Our Prayer, O Lord" George Whelpton 

MUSIC: "O Rest in the Lord" (from "Elijah") Felix Mendelssohn 

Richard Moses, '69, Tenor 

INTRODUCTION OF THE SPEAKER Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

President of the College 

COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS Dr. Vivian Henderson 

President, Clark College, Atlanta, Georgia 

MUSIC: "La donna e mobile" (from "Rigoletto") - Giuseppi Verdi 

Mr. Moses 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr. 

ALUMNI INDUCTION - -- — - Mr. Daniel Washington 

President, Savannah State College National Alumni 
Association, Savannah, Georgia 

PRESENTATION BY ~ Mrs. Edna Jackson, '68 

Class President 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE HYMN 

BENEDICTION The Rev. Samuel Williams 

THREE-FOLD AMEN 

RECESSIONAL: "Trumphal March" (from "Aida") - Giuseppi Verdi 



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DIVISION OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Accounting 

Mary L. Beal Cordele 

Skelton Key, Jr. Milledgeville 

General Business Administration 

Jeanette L. Frazier Savannah 

Ann R. Habersham Macon 

Irene Knight Dublin 

Ruth J. White Savannah 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

Elementary Education 

William A. Green Savannah 

Daphne Louise Jackson Savannah 

Bettye Jo Small Darien 

t*Doretha Buckley Thorpe Brunswick 

fMarizetta Lindsay Williams . Savannah 

Secondary Education 

Alma Louis Baker Milledgeville 

ENGLISH 

Halloray Benjamin Savannah 

General Science 

Joseph Greene Savannah 

Health, Physical Education & Recreation 
Carol J. Brannan Savannah 

FRENCH 

fCharles I. Holmes Savannah 

MATHEMATICS 

Laura D. Corbett Mungin Valdosta 

General Science 

Sadie Jean Nix Rutledge Columbus 

Social Science 

Margaret L. Thomas LaGrange 

Social science 

Georgia Mae Turner Greensboro 

Social Science 

Essie M. Williams Savannah 

MATHEMATICS 

*In Absentia 
fCum Laude 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

English 
Robert L. Joiner, II Covington 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biology 

Prince Johnson, Jr. Savannah 

Sandra Y. Snell McRae 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Sociology 

Sara Patricia Bass Savannah 

Patricia A. Belcher Columbus 

Charles Edward Boney Fitzgerald 

Murkel Bruce Coppins Columbus 

Edna Branch Jackson Savannah 

Marcia L. O'Brien Savannah 

Waltina K. Reddick Savannah 

*Jimmy Warren Sparta 

*In Absentia 

DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 

Dietetics & Institution Management 

Loretta Meredith Stephens Keysville 

Electronics Technology 

Clifford Johnson, III West Point 

Billy Simmons Savannah 

Phil West Tifton 



ACADEMIC COSTUMES 

Modern academic dress has evolved from a type of apparel prescribed 
by English Medieval Universities to distinguish their schools from the lay 
person in dress at a time when everybody wore robes or gowns. When Ameri- 
can colleges and univisities desired to adopt some suitable system of 
academic apparel a half century ago it seemed best to agree on some definite 
system which all might follow. Accordingly, this attire has consisted of the 
cap, the gown, and the hood, the latter two now differing according to the 
degree the wearer has received. 

The modern cap, in academic dress has the same design for all degrees; 
black and square-shaped with a tassel hanging from the center. However, 
the color of the tassel usually differentiates the field of study for which 
the degree was granted, the gold tassel being worn by doctors or by presi- 
dents of colleges and universities; but it may be added that the black 
tassel is correct for all degrees. 

The gown, unlike the cap, differs appreciably in design according to 
the degree conferred on the wearer. The gown for the bachelor's degree 
has pointed sleeves. It is designed to be worn closed. The gown for the 
master's degree, worn open or closed, has an oblong sleeve, open at the wrist, 
like the others. The sleeve base hangs down in the traditional manner. The 
rear part of its oblong shape is square cut and the front part has an arc 
cut away. The doctor's gown, worn open or closed, has long sleeves faced 
with velvet; three bars of velvet are midway the sleeves. The trimmings of 
the doctor's gown may be black or the color associated with the field of 
study. 

The hood, while not an article of dress, is however, the most distinctive 
feature of the academic attire. It is black, crow-shaped badge or adornment 
with an oval opening and worn down the back. It enables one to quickly de- 
termine not only the degree held by the wearer but also the college or uni- 
versity from which he graduated. The colors lining the hood and the size and 
shape of the hood make this distinction. The bachelor's and master's 
hoods are three feet and three and a half feet in length, respectvely; the 
doctor's hood is four feet in length and is made with a wide panel. Hoods 
may be worn for only those degrees actually held by the wearers. 

Members of the governing body of a college or university, and they 
only, whatever their degrees may be, are entitled to wear doctor's gowns 
(with black velvet), but their hoods may be only those of degrees actually 
held by the wearers or those especially prescribed for them by the institution. 

In some colleges and universities, it is customary for the president, 
chancellor, or chief officer to wear a costume similar to that worn by the 
head of a foreign university. 

The chief marshal may wear a specially designed costume approved by 
the institution. 

For all academic purposes, including trimmings of doctor's gowns, 
edging of hoods, and tassels of caps, the color associated with different sub- 
jects as prescribed by the revised American Intercollegiate Code is as follows: 

Agriculture Maise 

Arts, Letters, Humanities White 

Business Drab 

Economics Copper 

Education Light Blue 

Law Purple 

Library Science Lemon 

Music Pink 

Oratory — (Speech Silver Gray 

Philosophy __ Dark Blue 

Physical Education Sage Green 

Science Golden Yellow 

Theology Scarlet 

At Savannah State College, the lining of the hood has an orange 
chevron on a blue background to represent school colors. A faculty member 
wears the color of his alma mater. 



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